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Exploring Service Users’ Perceptions of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Psychosis: A User Led Study - Psychosis Research Unit
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Exploring Service Users’ Perceptions of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Psychosis: A User Led Study

Exploring Service Users’ Perceptions of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Psychosis: A User Led Study

Martina Kilbride, Rory Byrne, Jason Price, Lisa Wood, Sarah Barratt, Mary Welford and Anthony P. Morrison
Full Article

Abstract

Background and aims: This study explored individuals’ subjective experiences of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) with the aim of identifying coherent themes consistent across individual accounts and any potential barriers to CBTp effectiveness. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine individuals with experience of CBTp. A qualitative Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis was used to analyze the data collected to identify common themes. Results: Five super-ordinate themes emerged from our analyses: CBT as a process of person-centred engagement; CBT as an active process of structured learning; CBT helping to improve personal understanding; CBT is hard work; Recovery and outcomes of CBT for psychosis. Conclusions: The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

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Carl Bateson

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